Shamedown #12: Saleslady

It's hard to believe this is our last Shamedown of 2022...this year went quick and slow at the same time, didn't it? If anyone would like to know what a Shamedown is the details can be found here and past Shamedowns can be found here. And now, on with the show... Mistaken identity is a … Continue reading Shamedown #12: Saleslady

Shamedown #11: Happy-Go-Lucky

We've almost made it to December, all! As always, if anyone is arriving late and wants to know what a Shamedown is, the details can be found here. Past Shamedowns can be found here. Now, on with the show... Ah, the mistaken identity trope. And the amnesia trope. And the lookalike trope. And the espionage … Continue reading Shamedown #11: Happy-Go-Lucky

How To Make A Sequel

We all know there's a way to make a sequel and a way not to make a sequel, and 1935's The Bride of Frankenstein is a sequel that mostly got it right, because it both revisits what came before and does it one better. I know I'm not the first one to say this but it … Continue reading How To Make A Sequel

Shamedown #9: Telephone Operator

We're back for more shame! I'm always tempted to make "Love Potion #9" jokes when we get to this point in the year, but I'm not going to do that. If anyone is coming in late on this Shamedown business they can find the details here and past Shamedowns here. Off we go... I'm not sure … Continue reading Shamedown #9: Telephone Operator

Shamedown #7: Sky Racket

July is upon us, although obviously not for much longer, and we have quite the Shamedown ahead. If anyone is coming in late and would like to know what the heck a Shamedown is, the lowdown can be found here. Onward... I seem to have struck gold on the Poverty Row movies this year, and … Continue reading Shamedown #7: Sky Racket

Shamedown #4: Bank Alarm

Another Shamedown already? Kidding, it's all good. If anyone is just joining us and wants to know what the heck a Shamedown is, please click here. And now, on with our show... It's with a little bit of trepidation that I posted my Shamedown list this year, because I put a lot of Poverty Row … Continue reading Shamedown #4: Bank Alarm

Humanity Marches On

All right, as promised, here is my review of the 1936 H.G. Wells film, Things To Come, which is based on the 1933 novel and screenplay, The Shape of Things To Come. On one hand this movie is laughingly inaccurate and flawed, but on the other hand, it's very impressive. The film opens in the berg … Continue reading Humanity Marches On

Femme Dracula

I am woman, hear me roar... The Dracula universe is most definitely equal opportunity, and the sequel to the 1931 classic is 1936's Dracula's Daughter. Even though it might be nowhere near its predecessor in terms of quality or notoriety, it has some fun moments. It opens where the 1931 film left off. Two policemen … Continue reading Femme Dracula

Another Night At the Museum

Mwahahaha... Ever have something show up on your Amazon list and you have no idea how it got there? That was me with 1933's Mystery of the Wax Museum. Maybe I hit the save button by accident, who knows. Anyway, I left it on there because it looked intriguing, and it is. Directed by Michael … Continue reading Another Night At the Museum

Fredric the Prefect

Blogathon time... It's always interesting to delve into a performer's very early career, and while Fredric March was a longtime veteran of the screen, sound films were still finding their footing. One of many movies he made in 1932 was the racy Cecil B. DeMille epic, The Sign of the Cross. The film starts in … Continue reading Fredric the Prefect

Before the Rainbow

Judy Garland is so tied to the role of Dorothy, and pretty much every role that followed it, that it's easy to forget what her career was like before she clicked her Ruby Slippers together. One of my favorites of her pre-Oz movies is 1938's Listen, Darling, a fun road trip-meets-Parent Trap dramedy that features durable … Continue reading Before the Rainbow

Hit the Dance Floor

Tap, tap, tap... In 1936 Fred and Ginger were two years into their partnership, and Follow the Fleet was one of two movies they made that year. The film sports some Hollywood heavyweights and soon-to-be-heavyweights but is itself pretty lightweight. However, it's classic Fred and Ginger. Sparky chemistry, magical dance sequences, and fun. "Bake" Baker (Fred Astaire) … Continue reading Hit the Dance Floor

Oxford Calling

The Barrymores are back, y'all... In 1936, MGM established a branch of its studio in Britain, starting out at the Denham Studios in London. In 1938 three of its biggest stars made A Yank At Oxford there: Robert Taylor, Lionel Barrymore, and Maureen O'Sullivan, supported by a lady who would became rather infamous later. Lee (Robert Taylor) … Continue reading Oxford Calling

Five Reasons To See “Frankenstein”

Everybody knows who Frankenstein's monster is. Let's be honest. He's as notorious as Dracula with an almost equally formidable filmography. We'll go into that another time with a proper "Page To Screen," but today we're only interested in the 1931 Universal classic and why it's worth watching. Frankenstein came out ten months after Dracula and Universal Studios … Continue reading Five Reasons To See “Frankenstein”

Jean’s Breakthrough

Here's Miss Jean... Jean Arthur was an extremely competent actress and best remembered for her screwball comedies. She made several films with Frank Capra, one of which was the 1936 smash, Mr. Deeds Goes To Town. It was Arthur's breakthrough role and her first time working with Frank Capra, who was making the first of what would … Continue reading Jean’s Breakthrough

That Lubitsch Touch

Ernst Lubitsch was born in Berlin in 1892 and had a long career in Germany as a comic actor, writer, and director. Britannica says Lubitsch directed over forty films before coming to America in 1923. After seeing a Lubitsch film, people often ask, "What made Ernst Lubistch different?" Especially directors and writers, because they all … Continue reading That Lubitsch Touch

We’re Off To Lordsburg

In that jam-packed year of 1939, there were so many winning movies, too many to list here. The Wizard of Oz. Gone With the Wind. Mr. Smith Goes To Washington. Dodge City. The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. Dark Victory. Just to name a very few. The only film we're interested in today, though, is Stagecoach. This John … Continue reading We’re Off To Lordsburg