During World War Two: The Pacific Theater (Part Two)

When we last left off, America had temporarily pulled out of the Philippines as the last holdouts, Bataan and Corregidor fell to the Japanese, putting thousands of American and Filipino troops and civilians in the hands of enemy forces. Those who weren't murdered were herded into camps, where they faced extremely harsh conditions, and even … Continue reading During World War Two: The Pacific Theater (Part Two)

During World War Two: The Pacific Theater (Part One)

The war in the Pacific and the events leading up to it are very seldom taught, if ever, in schools today. In my case, and it's probably the same for a lot of film buffs and history lovers, movies made about that part of World War Two sparked interest in learning more. It's a complicated … Continue reading During World War Two: The Pacific Theater (Part One)

During World War Two: You’re In the Armed Forces Now

Between 1941 and 1942 America's military went from approximately 1.8 million to almost four million, and by the end of the war around twelve million Americans were in the Armed Forces. The popular myth about the United States in the period immediately following Pearl Harbor is that recruitment offices were jammed with volunteers, but according … Continue reading During World War Two: You’re In the Armed Forces Now

During World War II: There’s A War On, You Know

And we must wipe out completely for the duration of the war the idea of business as usual. --Elliot Fulton, played by Edward Arnold, The War Against Mrs. Hadley (MGM,1942) This one sentence sums up the mission of the Office of War Information, or OWI, which was established on June 13, 1942. It's putting it mildly that … Continue reading During World War II: There’s A War On, You Know

The Art of the Anne Frank Biopic

Today it's eighty years exactly since Anne Frank started her diary, and as of July sixth, eighty years exactly since the Frank family went into hiding. Anne once wrote that she wanted to go on living even after her death, and therefore she was grateful to God for the gift of writing. She has certainly … Continue reading The Art of the Anne Frank Biopic

With the Crew of the “Memphis Belle”

As we all know, a big part of the Second World War was each side bombing the other for various purposes. Britain and the United States tagteamed their bombing of German war production sites; the Brits went at night, but the Americans chose to drop their bombs during the daytime. Both actions were risky, but … Continue reading With the Crew of the “Memphis Belle”

During World War Two: Remember Pearl Harbor

Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously called December 7, 1941 "a date that will live in infamy." Eighty-plus years later, December seventh is still infamous, although the media nowadays seems to use Pearl Harbor mostly as a metaphor instead of an actuality. 9-11, for instance, has been compared to Pearl Harbor more times than anyone can shake … Continue reading During World War Two: Remember Pearl Harbor

During World War Two: With A Little Help From My Friends

After Britain and Germany declared war in 1939, there were roughly two years in which America, for all intents and purposes, laid low. Sort of. Not really. The first Neutrality Act was signed by Franklin Delano Roosevelt on August 31, 1935, and it would be renewed several times over the next few years. The Act … Continue reading During World War Two: With A Little Help From My Friends

During World War Two: The “N” Word (No, Not THAT One)

Hollywood had a little appeasement issue early in the Second World War; namely, they avoided a certain four-letter word starting with "N" and ending in "I." It was no secret what the Nazis and their friends were up to. Everyone knew they were committing atrocities against the Jewish people and anyone else who went against … Continue reading During World War Two: The “N” Word (No, Not THAT One)

During World War Two: Serious Days

Well, folks, we're happy to be back with you again, and on behalf of the Johnson Wax people and our cast, may we say that we're not unconscious of the fact that these are serious days. --Jim Jordan of the Fibber McGee and Molly radio show, September 5, 1939. On September first, Britain declared war … Continue reading During World War Two: Serious Days

During World War Two: Beginnings

Et voilá, that new series I hinted at last month: We're going to be talking about Hollywood's response to the war and how the war affected movies and radio shows produced during that time. As those of you who have been around Taking Up Room for any length of time have no doubt seen, the nineteen-forties … Continue reading During World War Two: Beginnings

Why I’ve Seen “Since You Went Away” Umpteen Times

Since You Went Away is very well-trod territory for me. I've parsed it, studied it, scoured the Web for information about it. I've even counted the number of times the movie mentions war bonds and stamps (five times and twice, respectively, in case anyone is wondering). For those who might not be familiar with the plot, it follows … Continue reading Why I’ve Seen “Since You Went Away” Umpteen Times

A Date And A Movie Which Live In Infamy

The attack on Pearl Harbor happened eighty years ago today. Eighty years ago, America discarded its temporary neutrality and entered the war in a dramatic fashion, although we weren't exactly prepared. And yet few movies have been made about the actual event, beyond Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) and Michael Bay's awkwardly inaccurate 2001 boom-fest. Most of … Continue reading A Date And A Movie Which Live In Infamy

Page To Screen: Anne Frank Remembered

Miep Gies was the last of the Secret Annex helpers to survive, passing away in 2010 just shy of her 101st birthday. She and Anne had a special sisterly relationship from the time Anne was four, and naturally people wanted to know more about that. In 1987, she published a book, Anne Frank Remembered, with Alison Leslie … Continue reading Page To Screen: Anne Frank Remembered

I Shall Return

One of the Second World War's most iconic images is that of General Douglas MacArthur wading through the surf at Leyte in his long-promised return to the Philippines. While that incident has famously been called "staged," it was and it wasn't. MacArthur's landing craft was unable to take him right up to the beach because … Continue reading I Shall Return

Reading Rarities: The American Home Front, 1941-1942

When most people think of Alistair Cooke, at least people of my generation and before, we think of the dapper English gentleman on Masterpiece Theatre or Upstairs Downstairs, sitting in the posh wing chair bidding all of us a good evening before introducing that night's program. Mr. Cooke was an institution, and Masterpiece Theatre hasn't … Continue reading Reading Rarities: The American Home Front, 1941-1942

Page To Screen: Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo

When looking at America's entry into the Second World War seventy-plus years on, it might be hard to believe how high the stakes really were in early 1942. The United States' armed forces were very small, we were still using cavalry horses and bayonets, and the Japanese dealt Americans heavy blows at Pearl Harbor and … Continue reading Page To Screen: Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo